Select Page
Safe driving in bad weather

Safe driving in bad weather

With the change in seasons throughout the year and the continued increase of motor vehicle traffic in the UK, it is likely that you will encounter bad weather when driving. In the winter months, a driver is at increased risk of visual impairment, such as heavy rain, snow or hail. The road surface is different due to ice, leaves and surface water. Statistically, a driver is 20% more likely to have an accident when driving in poor weather conditions.

Preparation for bad weather

Bad weather can sneak up on us, but it is safe to say that it is more likely during the winter months. We can definitely expect more rain and wind. These alone can make driving hazardous with reduced visibility and increased risk of losing control of the car. There are a few simple steps that car owners can take as winter approaches to reduce the risk. One very low-cost tip is to make sure that the windscreen wipers are fit for purpose – this will be invaluable when an unexpected downpour hits when on a long motorway journey. Also, check that the tyre tread is within legal thresholds – this is especially important when expecting higher levels of surface water on the roads. A tyre with higher tread depth will have greater grip on the road and be much safer.

Setting out

The first thing that you should ask yourself when setting out on a journey when the weather is bad is “do I really have to make this trip?”. Of course, the safest answer is no – if you don’t go out then there is no danger. If the answer is yes, then make sure both the driver and vehicle are ready for the trip. If your car is covered with snow or ice, it is very tempting to just clear enough to be able to see out of the driver’s window. However, please take the time to remove the visual obstructions from all windows and lights. Any restriction could cause a hazard to be missed, including other vehicles not seeing you due to your headlights being blurred.

Driving tips

If the trip is important and cannot be delayed until weather conditions improve, try to schedule the majority of the driving to be during daylight hours. This will improve visibility and reduce risk. Even when heading out in the daylight, it is very important to check the headlights before starting out. If visibility is slightly reduced, it is highly advisable to turn on your headlights, even during the daytime. Dense fog will need fog lights to be turned on at short notice, so make sure you know how to turn these on before you start the car!

When making that unavoidable journey in bad weather, adjust your driving style to suit the conditions. This can just mean going a little slower than usual to give you a fraction longer to react if something should happen on the road ahead. It is also a good idea to be weary should there be standing water (aka a big puddle) ahead – if needs be stop to assess the depth of the puddle before entering. You don’t want to get halfway through to find out that the puddle is too deep for the car only for the engine to cut out!

Cataract Surgery – Better Or Worse For Older Drivers?

Cataract Surgery – Better Or Worse For Older Drivers?

Recent figures from the DVLA show that the number of people in the UK aged over 90 with a driving licence topped the 100,000 figure for the first time since records started. In addition, the figures also reveal that 4.5 million people over the age of 70 also hold a driving licence.

We all undergo physical and mental changes as we grow older. Recognising and understanding these changes is important if you are the driver of a motor vehicle. In addition to the physical and mental changes, as we grow older there are a number of medical conditions that may impact our ability to drive a vehicle. One, in particular, can have a significant impact, cataract surgery. It is estimated that 330,000 operations per year in England alone are performed and 10% of people aged over 65 have already had cataract surgery.

Has age caught you up?

Growing old is just a natural part of our lifecycle and the changes our bodies go through with the advancement of time is beyond our control. Many drivers continue to use their vehicles well beyond the age of 70. The Automobile Association (AA) estimate that by 2030 over 90% of men over the age of 70 will be behind the wheel.

It is sensible to stop and re-evaluate your own ability to continue driving as you get older. Self-awareness is important, if you feel uncomfortable driving, you should stop and discuss it through with your family and your GP.

Types of changes – physical and mental

Physical changes are the more obvious to notice, although some of these can be gradual over a long period of time. This makes acknowledgement of these changes more difficult to accept. Changes to your vision. Even if you do not wear prescribed glasses you may experience problems in low light or at night; glare from approaching vehicles; locating objects in your peripheral vision; and judgement of distances.

Changes to your hearing. Will make it difficult to detect sirens from approaching emergency vehicles; other car users horns; and warning sounds from inside your own vehicle. Decreased strength and flexibility. This may manifest itself as joint pain or inflammation that restricts movement; checking your blind spot, and making steering more difficult.

Mental changes that may impact senior drivers include: decreased reaction time may impact your ability to process lots of information quickly; reduced attention span that may cause loss of concentration; and, a cognitive ability that may reduce the ability to remember such things as your destination or the meaning of road signs.

The Royal Society for Prevention of Accidents (ROSPA) suggests that older drivers may benefit from a refresher driving course. This can reassure older drivers who may have concerns about their driving abilities.

Medical Reasons – cataract surgery

There are a number of medical conditions that can impact our ability to operate a vehicle including: dementia, diabetes, arthritis, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Cataracts in one or both eyes can impact your ability to drive.

There is plenty of statistical evidence that confirms a vast improvement in eyesight for cataract patients. However, there are a number of drivers who are unable or limited to in their nighttime driving following cataract surgery. The problem is linked to the type of lens used to replace the natural lens. Intraocular lenses Lens (IOL) are smaller than the natural lens in the eye. Following surgery, this can lead to glare or a halo effect. This is because light entering the eye is picked up by the edge of the IOL.

This halo effect can make it almost impossible to drive a vehicle at night. The problem is compounded by the other possible health and mental changes that some older drivers experience.

If you have had cataract surgery and are experiencing glare or halo issues these should be discussed with your GP or healthcare professional.

At some point, we all must stop and consider our own safety and the safety of other road users. This may be due to one single event like cataract surgery or more likely, it will be as a result of a number of different factors. The important thing to remember is that you are the best person to make that important judgement call.

Lincs Driving Solutions, Lincoln